Tag: United States of America

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Proposed Regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act: A Step in the Right Direction but Far from the Destination
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Pushing for Change: Congress Pushes for Privacy Legislation ahead of CCPA
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The FBI understands if you pay ransom to cyber hackers, but isn’t too pleased about it
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Eureka! California Just Adopted a Strong Consumer Privacy Law
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U.S. data breaches reached record high in 2016: Report

Proposed Regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act: A Step in the Right Direction but Far from the Destination

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

We recently blogged about the intention of Californian lawmakers to enact stringent privacy regulations through the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). In particular, we noted the useful guidance provided by our colleagues over at The Privacist on the impact of potential contingencies for organisations.

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Pushing for Change: Congress Pushes for Privacy Legislation ahead of CCPA

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

With the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) looming, Californian lawmakers have affirmed their intention to enact stringent privacy protections, with the legislature adjourning without making any major changes to the state’s landmark privacy laws.

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The FBI understands if you pay ransom to cyber hackers, but isn’t too pleased about it

By Cameron Abbott and Karla Hodgson

While the FBI won’t be impressed if you pay ransomware demands in order to get your systems or data back after a cyber attack, its updated ransomware guidance contemplates that this might just be the outcome of an attack anyway.

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Eureka! California Just Adopted a Strong Consumer Privacy Law

By Susan P Altman

While the rest of us were still recovering from the May 25 effective date of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), California, the most populous and largest economy of any of the United States, confidently adopted a broad consumer privacy law. The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) was enacted June 28 and becomes operative on January 1, 2020. Unlike existing industry-specific U.S. privacy laws, the CCPA has a broad overall scope, more like the GDPR. It ensures California residents the right to know what information about them is being collected and sold or disclosed, to reject the sale of their personal information, to access the information, and to receive equal service and price, even if they exercise their privacy rights.

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U.S. data breaches reached record high in 2016: Report

By Cameron Abbott 

According to a report highlighting findings from the Identity Theft Resource Center and CyberScout:

  • Data breaches in the U.S. reached an all-time high in 2016, with the number of breaches tracked reaching 1,093, a 40% increase from the year earlier
  • The financial services industry accounted for only 52 of the breaches, or 4.8%, making it the least hit of the five industries tracked. Business, healthcare, education and the government and military were hacked more than the financial services industry
  • For the eighth consecutive year, hacking, skimming and phishing were the main drivers of data breaches, representing 55.5% of all reported incidents. Many were due to CEO phishing in which sensitive data is exposed
  • While consumers and businesses are constantly warned to pay close attention to their email, breaches that used email and the internet as a way to hack people only accounted for 9.2% of all the hacks, while employee error was responsible for 8.7% of the hacks.

This isn’t the first data set to show that data breaches surged in 2016. According to Gemalto’s Breach Level Index, in the first six months of 2016, data breaches rose 15%, and the number of compromised data records jumped 31% compared to the previous six months. The findings also revealed that 64% of all data breaches involve identity and personal data theft.

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