Tag: U.S. cybersecurity priorities

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Report savages US Government agencies’ cybersecurity efforts
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North Korean cyberattacks increase ahead of summit
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US Department of Homeland Security unveils five point strategy to combat cyber risk
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Equifax data breach: 143 million records exposed but senior executives not told immediately?
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A New Cyber Regulator on the Beat: The CFPB Issues its First Cybersecurity Order and Fine
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The EU-US Privacy Shield has been released
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Apple sends passionate message to customers following court order to hack iPhone
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‘EU-US Privacy Shield’ agreed for trans-Atlantic data flow
9
Government Regulation, Legislation and Enforcement Updates

Report savages US Government agencies’ cybersecurity efforts

By Cameron Abbott and Sarah Goegan

You would think government agencies would have a keen focus on cybersecurity risks, but apparently not! A report by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has found that nearly three-quarters of Federal agencies reviewed have either “at risk” or “high risk” cybersecurity arrangements. 71 of 96 agencies assessed were either missing, had insufficiently deployed or had significant gaps in their fundamental cybersecurity policies, processes or tools.

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North Korean cyberattacks increase ahead of summit

By Cameron Abbott and Sarah Goegan

North Korean cyberattack activity appears to have ramped up ahead of the highly anticipated US-North Korea summit, which is expected to take place on 12 June 2018.

North Korean hackers known as Group 123 have been identified as the party responsible for new malware activity targeting users in South Korea.

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US Department of Homeland Security unveils five point strategy to combat cyber risk

By Cameron Abbott and Sarah Goegan

This week, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released its Cybersecurity Strategy. The five “pillar” strategy will be executed by the DHS over the next five years, and aims to improve national cybersecurity risk management.

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Equifax data breach: 143 million records exposed but senior executives not told immediately?

By Cameron Abbott and Olivia Coburn

Equifax has joined Yahoo on the podium for the award no one wants: suffering one of the largest data breaches in history.

Equifax, one of the three largest US credit reporting agencies, announced last week that it suffered a cybersecurity incident potentially impacting 143 million US consumers –  a figure comprising of roughly 55 per cent of Americans aged 18 years or older. Some UK and Canadian residents are also affected.

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A New Cyber Regulator on the Beat: The CFPB Issues its First Cybersecurity Order and Fine

By Ted Kornobis

On March 2, 2016, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) instituted its first data security enforcement action, in the form of a consent order against online payment platform Dwolla, Inc.

The CFPB joins several other regulators that have recently issued statements or instituted enforcement actions in this space, including the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), Commodities Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”), the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”), the National Futures Association (“NFA”), the Department of Justice (“DOJ”), state attorneys general, and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), which has been active in this area for several years.

To read more click here.

The EU-US Privacy Shield has been released

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

The European Commission has now officially released the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, which sets out the key requirements and principles for trans-Atlantic data flow between Europe to the US.

Read our colleague’s article on the announcement here.

Alternatively, access the European Commission’s Press Release here.

Apple sends passionate message to customers following court order to hack iPhone

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

A US District Court has ordered Apple to assist US law enforcement agents to bypass the security features, disable the auto-erase function and ultimately access the data contained within an iPhone 5C that was used by one of the San Bernardino shooters, Syed Rizwan Farook.

Apple’s CEO Tim Cook responded to the order with an open letter to customers discussing the privacy and security implications of the order and calling for public discussion on the issue.

Read Apple’s Customer Letter here.

Access the Court Order here.

‘EU-US Privacy Shield’ agreed for trans-Atlantic data flow

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

A new trans-Atlantic data transfer framework has been agreed between the European Commission and the United States this week. Known as the ‘EU-US Privacy Shield’, the new arrangement is intended to offer greater legal certainty for businesses and afford EU citizens increased protection when their data is transferred across the Atlantic to the US.

The new regulations will replace the US-EU Safe Harbor framework, which was invalidated by the European Court of Justice last October on the basis that the generalised access that public authorities had to the data and content of electronic communications violated fundamental privacy rights. Read our earlier blog post on the Safe Harbour decision here.

The key features of the new EU-US Privacy Shield are:

  • Stronger obligations on US companies to protect the personal data of EU citizens
  • More robust enforcement powers granted to both EU and US regulators, including greater monitoring and prosecution by the US Department of Commence and Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
  • Clearer conditions, limitations, redress avenues and safeguards for data transferred across the Atlantic
  • Expanded obligations for US companies to prove compliance
  • Several new avenues for EU citizens to lodge complaints about data misuse, including the establishment of a new independent privacy Ombudsman

The new Privacy Shield is still awaiting final approval from the College of Commissioners and will be subject to further review by the Article 29 Working Party before it is introduced. Much of the detail has not been released, so while the principles have been articulated, the impact on the obligations of affected companies is still far from clear.

Read the European Commission press release here for further details.

Our US and EU colleagues have drafted a more detail description which can be accessed here for further information.

Government Regulation, Legislation and Enforcement Updates

by Jim Bulling and Julia Baldi

China Introduces new Cybersecurity Laws
China introduced new cybersecurity laws, which require both local and foreign banks and financial institutions with Chinese clients (including Australian financial institutions) to use IT equipment deemed “secure and controllable” by Beijing. The breadth of the laws has upset foreign financial institutions given the potential cost of compliance if foreign entities must implement IT equipment systems in accordance with Chinese directives.

See the Financial Times report here.

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