Tag: iot

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Apple Watch data leads to arrest of suspected murderer
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“Hey Google, could you be used against me in court?”
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Cybersecurity in the age of the Internet of Things
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Amazon Web Services announces Internet of Things (IoT) security service
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Is your IoT device putting you at risk?
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ATMs Remain Vulnerable Worldwide

Apple Watch data leads to arrest of suspected murderer

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

Last month we blogged about the potential for data from our smart devices being used against us in court. Well, that potential has now been realised in Australia, with prosecutors in a murder trial in Adelaide telling the court that data from the victim’s Apple Watch helped pin down her suspected murderer.

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“Hey Google, could you be used against me in court?”

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

Smart home devices like the Google Home and Amazon Echo were popular gifts this past Christmas – just like Fitbits have been the Christmases past.

But could these smart devices that we rely on to seek out and relay information to us, turn on our favourite music, or count our calories and steps, be used to produce evidence against us, if we were to commit a crime? Read More

Cybersecurity in the age of the Internet of Things

By Cameron Abbott, Keely O’Dowd and Harry Crawford

The Internet of Things (IoT) allows unprecedented interconnectivity for consumers, and unfortunately for those consumers, hackers as well.

The European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) recently released a report to provide insight into the security requirements of IoT and good practices recommendations on preventing and mitigating cyber-attacks against IoT systems. The report even includes examples of IoT cyber security attack scenarios.

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Amazon Web Services announces Internet of Things (IoT) security service

By Cameron Abbott and Giles Whittaker

Amazon Web Services rolled out an IoT service called IoT Device Defender to limit risks from unsecured IoT devices. The service will monitor an entire fleet of devices for compliance policies and best practices. As such, an organization can set the normal operational parameters and policies for a given fleet of devices and then Device Defender will make sure those policies are enforced.

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Is your IoT device putting you at risk?

By Cameron Abbott and Giles Whittaker

As the uptake of IoT (Internet of Things) devices increases, industry experts question whether adequate cybersecurity measures are in place. While we are not surprised with the results of a recent survey, it has been confirmed that IoT devices represent the next big cybersecurity threat.

A Tripwire study found 96% of surveyed IT pros expect to see an increase in security attacks on IoT. The study acknowledges the promise of these devices in facilitating tasks and bringing convenience, but also notes the risk they pose as they’re not always built with security in mind. The study found the industries facing the biggest threat include energy, utilities, government, healthcare and finance with devices connecting the Industrial Internet of Things viewed as susceptible to serious consequences. David Meltzer, COO at Tripwire, says there must be a change in the level of preparation for such attacks or the realization of these risks will be experienced.

ATMs Remain Vulnerable Worldwide

By Susan Altman

Bank ATMs worldwide remain vulnerable to security hacks according to Bank Info Security®.  A recent large theft of cash from dozens of ATMs in Taiwan using malicious software highlights the continuing problem.  Investigators suspect two Russian nationals were behind the hack.  Three types of malware were reported to have been used, which may have enabled the bad guys to command the machines to dispense large amounts of cash simply by sending a text message.

ATMs are considered vulnerable because of their aging software.  According to Kaspersky Lab, about 90% of the world’s ATM machines still run Window XP, the software operating system Microsoft generally stopped supporting in April 2014.  Most ATM manufacturers continued to use Windows XP, layering on other security software while trying lock down the operating system to protect account data.  In addition to using old software, some ATMs are physically accessed by a single key that opens up an entire fleet of the physical boxes holding the machine’s computer—a triumph of human convenience over security.  Finally, ATMs need a network connection in order to communicate with banks, so like all IoT devices and machines, they are vulnerable to remote hacks.

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