Tag: internet of things

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So you plug your shiny Tesla in to charge…
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Internet of Things security flaw – key card locks vulnerable
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Apple Watch data leads to arrest of suspected murderer
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“Hey Google, could you be used against me in court?”
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Cybersecurity in the age of the Internet of Things
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Amazon Web Services announces Internet of Things (IoT) security service
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Update everything: Discovery of Wi-Fi flaw in connected devices
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Is your IoT device putting you at risk?
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Mirai Botnet knocks Liberia offline
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Threat from hackers against Internet of Things grows

So you plug your shiny Tesla in to charge…

By Cameron Abbott and Wendy Mansell

…and suddenly you are at risk of starting fires.

We all know that these days the Internet of Things is a favourite for cyberattacks, with the latest target being home charging stations for electric cars.

Many home charging stations are controlled remotely by mobile apps, which seem to provide the perfect opportunity for hackers to cause harm.

Hackers cleverly can infiltrate an account and turn charging off or even worse, they may change the current to the extent it can start a fire.

Once again the industry needs to take security seriously for IoT and have the same diligence as IT networks now do.

Internet of Things security flaw – key card locks vulnerable

Cameron Abbott, Warwick Andersen, Rob Pulham and Georgia Mills

It is a technology so innocuous that it hardly gets a second thought: electronic hotel key cards have been replacing the humble lock and key for over two decades. A recent study by Finnish security researchers has revealed a vulnerability in the technology. The discovery came as a result of the researchers’ obsession over many years to solve a mystery of how a laptop was stolen from a hotel room without leaving a trace. (Small consolation that it cannot have been easy to do given how long it took!)

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Apple Watch data leads to arrest of suspected murderer

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

Last month we blogged about the potential for data from our smart devices being used against us in court. Well, that potential has now been realised in Australia, with prosecutors in a murder trial in Adelaide telling the court that data from the victim’s Apple Watch helped pin down her suspected murderer.

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“Hey Google, could you be used against me in court?”

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

Smart home devices like the Google Home and Amazon Echo were popular gifts this past Christmas – just like Fitbits have been the Christmases past.

But could these smart devices that we rely on to seek out and relay information to us, turn on our favourite music, or count our calories and steps, be used to produce evidence against us, if we were to commit a crime? Read More

Cybersecurity in the age of the Internet of Things

By Cameron Abbott, Keely O’Dowd and Harry Crawford

The Internet of Things (IoT) allows unprecedented interconnectivity for consumers, and unfortunately for those consumers, hackers as well.

The European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) recently released a report to provide insight into the security requirements of IoT and good practices recommendations on preventing and mitigating cyber-attacks against IoT systems. The report even includes examples of IoT cyber security attack scenarios.

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Amazon Web Services announces Internet of Things (IoT) security service

By Cameron Abbott and Giles Whittaker

Amazon Web Services rolled out an IoT service called IoT Device Defender to limit risks from unsecured IoT devices. The service will monitor an entire fleet of devices for compliance policies and best practices. As such, an organization can set the normal operational parameters and policies for a given fleet of devices and then Device Defender will make sure those policies are enforced.

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Update everything: Discovery of Wi-Fi flaw in connected devices

By Cameron Abbott, Rob Pulham and Olivia Coburn

A Belgian researcher has discovered a weakness in WPA-2, the security protocol used in the majority of routers and devices including computers, mobile phones and connected household appliances, to secure internet and wireless network connections.

The researcher, Mathy Vanhoef, has named the flaw KRACK, for Key Reinstallation Attack.

Any device that supports Wi-Fi is likely to be affected by KRACK, albeit devices will have different levels of vulnerability depending on their operating systems. Linux and Android are believed to be more susceptible than Windows and iOS, and devices running Android 6.0 are reportedly particularly vulnerable.

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Is your IoT device putting you at risk?

By Cameron Abbott and Giles Whittaker

As the uptake of IoT (Internet of Things) devices increases, industry experts question whether adequate cybersecurity measures are in place. While we are not surprised with the results of a recent survey, it has been confirmed that IoT devices represent the next big cybersecurity threat.

A Tripwire study found 96% of surveyed IT pros expect to see an increase in security attacks on IoT. The study acknowledges the promise of these devices in facilitating tasks and bringing convenience, but also notes the risk they pose as they’re not always built with security in mind. The study found the industries facing the biggest threat include energy, utilities, government, healthcare and finance with devices connecting the Industrial Internet of Things viewed as susceptible to serious consequences. David Meltzer, COO at Tripwire, says there must be a change in the level of preparation for such attacks or the realization of these risks will be experienced.

Mirai Botnet knocks Liberia offline

By Cameron Abbott and Rebecca Murray

After launching attacks on security expert Brian Krebs and the servers at Dyn, it appears as though the Mirai botnet has knocked the entire country of Liberia offline. Yes the country.  Given the paucity of protections on the Internet of Things with even weaker controls on adequate passwords, Mirai has a powerful base to co-opt and launch from.  That said a country is no mean achievement, albeit only with a population of 4.5 million and fewer than 10% of its citizens having internet access, the target was a small one. However, it is possible this attack is only the beginning for a new display of Mirai botnet’s capabilities. The attack peaked at a 500Gbps, a relatively modest figure when compared with the Dyn and Brian Krebs attacks.

Judging from the quick succession of recent attacks, we won’t be waiting long before we see another target of this highly effective botnet. Forbes has covered this in more detail here.

Threat from hackers against Internet of Things grows

By Cameron Abbott and Rebecca Murray

New research by Akamai Technologies has revealed that cyber criminals have cracked into as many as two million Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices at homes and businesses. IoT devices are products that connect to the internet, which now include refrigerators, sound systems, televisions and home security systems. In the report, researchers state that “Once malicious users access the web administration console of these device they can then compromise the device’s data and in some cases, take over the machine.” This report sheds much needed light on one of the most under-focused on areas of cyber security. Read the report here.

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