Tag: Hack

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Former MasterChef contestant falls victim to online fraud attack
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Research reports say risks to smartphone security aren’t phoney
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Not so happy families: Online genealogy website suffers data breach
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Study reveals massive cost of cybercrime for Asia Pacific businesses
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Cybersecurity vulnerability revealed after NSW Government agency’s 49-day hack
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Open for business, ransomware authors and perpetrators cashing in on emerging dark web marketplace economy
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Just one of 734: Australian defence contractor hacked
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Equifax data breach: 143 million records exposed but senior executives not told immediately?
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Security incidents high, confidence to manage them low. Really? We did see this coming – why aren’t we better prepared?
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Australia Affected By Global Ransomware Attacks

Research reports say risks to smartphone security aren’t phoney

By Rob Pulham, Warwick Andersen and Sarah Goegan

Beware! Your favourite apps may be putting your phone and data at risk. Reports from Allot and BitSight have examined rising threats to the security of our mobile devices.

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Not so happy families: Online genealogy website suffers data breach

By Cameron Abbott, Rob Pulham and Sarah Goegan

Online genealogy platform MyHeritage suffered a major data breach in which email addresses and hashed passwords of over 92 million users were leaked. The data breach occurred in October 2017, but was not discovered until 4 June 2018.

MyHeritage became aware of the breach after a security researcher found a file named “myheritage” on a private server. The file contained all the email addresses of MyHeritage users who signed up through to 26 October 2017, and their hashed passwords.

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Study reveals massive cost of cybercrime for Asia Pacific businesses

By Cameron Abbott and Sarah Goegan

We all know that cybersecurity incidents can cost your organisation a lot of money, but exactly how much? A report by Frost and Sullivan has found that losses from cyberattacks in the Asia Pacific region (APAC) could reach a staggering US$1.75 trillion, nearly 7 per cent of the region’s gross domestic product in 2017. As covered in our blog last week, the cost of cyber scams alone in Australia totalled $340 million AUD last year.

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Cybersecurity vulnerability revealed after NSW Government agency’s 49-day hack

By Cameron Abbott and Harry Crawford

The NSW Government’s vulnerability to hacking has been exposed in a report by state’s auditor-general, in which it was revealed that one government agency took 49 days to shut down a hack.

This hack started with an email account of the unnamed agency being compromised and used to send out “phishing” emails to get the credentials of finance staff members. By day 20, 300 staff had clicked on the bogus link in the phishing email. 200 email accounts ended up being under the control of the hackers.

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Open for business, ransomware authors and perpetrators cashing in on emerging dark web marketplace economy

By Cameron Abbott and Giles Whittaker

The emergence of a booming dark web marketplace has facilitated the skyrocketing ransomware sales from US$249,287.05 in 2016 to US$6,237,248.90 as of September 2017, representing a growth rate of 2,502%. This rapid growth is in part due to not only the effectiveness of ransomware as a criminal enterprise but the increased availability to partake in such activities. According to a recent report by Carbon Black, The Ransomware Economy: How and Why the Dark Web Marketplace for Ransomware Is Growing at a Rates of More than 2,500% Per Year, there are 45,000 ransomware product lines at an average price of US$10.50 and includes various do-it yourself (DIY) kits.

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Just one of 734: Australian defence contractor hacked

By Cameron Abbott and Olivia Coburn

A hacker has breached the computer system of an unnamed defence contractor and stolen 30 gigabytes of data, including information on Australia’s $17 billion Joint Strike Fighter program.

The data breach, which the Australian Government publicly disclosed last week, also includes information about Australia’s $4 billion P-8 surveillance plane project, Collins Class submarines and the warships HMAS Canberra and HMAS Adelaide. The Government has emphasised that the stolen data is commercially sensitive but not classified.

The announcement coincides with the release of the Australian Cyber Security Centre’s 2017 Threat Report, available here, which reveals that the hack is among 734 cyber incidents affecting private sector systems of national interest and critical infrastructure providers.

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Equifax data breach: 143 million records exposed but senior executives not told immediately?

By Cameron Abbott and Olivia Coburn

Equifax has joined Yahoo on the podium for the award no one wants: suffering one of the largest data breaches in history.

Equifax, one of the three largest US credit reporting agencies, announced last week that it suffered a cybersecurity incident potentially impacting 143 million US consumers –  a figure comprising of roughly 55 per cent of Americans aged 18 years or older. Some UK and Canadian residents are also affected.

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Security incidents high, confidence to manage them low. Really? We did see this coming – why aren’t we better prepared?

By Cameron Abbott and Olivia Coburn

RiskIQ, a US-based cyber security company, has reported that 40% of businesses surveyed in the US and the UK have experienced 5 or more significant security incidents in the past 12 months. Significant incidents include malware, targeted attacks, mobile exposures, rogue mobile apps, website or brand abuse, phishing and social impersonation.

RiskIQ, through IDG Connect, also surveyed the confidence of corporate decision-makers in their ability to handle and mitigate cyber threats. Their report, 2017 State of Enterprise Digital Defense Report, reveals that nearly two-thirds of respondents had no to modest confidence in their ability to manage digital threats.

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Australia Affected By Global Ransomware Attacks

By Cameron Abbott and Ling Zhu

Despite Australia seemingly avoiding the brunt of the attacks by the WannaCry ransomware crippling computer systems around the world last month, a few Australian organisations have not emerged unscathed.

Victoria Police has revealed 280 speed cameras around Victoria were exposed to WannaCry between June 6 and June 22. Although the cameras were not connected to the internet, the ransomware was unintentionally introduced to the system through a USB device during maintenance. The police reported that the ransomware caused the cameras to continually reboot, however it is unclear whether this resulted in inaccurate readings. Initially, only 55 speed and red-light cameras were thought to be infected, however that has since increased to 280 cameras. Subsequently, 1,673 infringement tickets will be withdrawn, with another 5,500 pending tickets to be embargoed. Now don’t get excited and start drag racing – the police intend to continue operating the cameras, with embargoed and new tickets to be issued once they confirm that cameras are taking accurate readings.

Meanwhile in Hobart, Cadbury chocolate factory has stopped production following its parent company, Mondelez International, being affected by the similar “Petya” ransomware. The US-based Mondelez International suffered a global IT outage overnight, with all network computers being infected. Australian workers were unable to begin production in the Cadbury factory on June 28, as many processes are automated and controlled by computers. It is uncertain when the global system will be restored.

Now speed cameras is one thing, but affecting chocolate production is way out of line!

A reminder that both WannaCry and Petya exploit vulnerabilities that have been patched – you just have to load those security releases. A call out to all the chocolate producers of the world – load your patches for the sake of us all!

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