Tag: cybersecurity agency

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Credential stuffing during COVID-19: Cybersecurity firm purchased over 500,000 Zoom account credentials on the dark web and hacker forums
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Drive to Expand Australian Cyber Spy Powers
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Government Regulation, Legislation and Enforcement Updates

Credential stuffing during COVID-19: Cybersecurity firm purchased over 500,000 Zoom account credentials on the dark web and hacker forums

By Cameron Abbott, Michelle Aggromito and Rebecca Gill

In what could only be adding fuel to the fire that is the growing concern over Zoom’s privacy and data security risks, it has been reported that over 500,000 Zoom accounts were sold on the dark web and hacker forums earlier in April. The accounts were purchased by cybersecurity firm Cyble after it noticed free Zoom accounts were being posted on hacker forums.

Cyble was able to purchase approximately 530,000 Zoom credentials, which included a user’s email address, password, personal meeting URL, and their HostKey (a six-digit number used to host meetings on Zoom). Victims included well-known companies such as Chase, Citibank and educational institutions including the University of Colorado and the University of Florida. According to Cyble, credentials belonging to its clients in the bulk purchase were also confirmed to be correct.

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Drive to Expand Australian Cyber Spy Powers

By Warwick AndersenRob Pulham and Georgia Mills

Australia’s military cyber spy agency, the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), could soon be receiving radical new espionage powers to monitor Australian citizens for the first time. If approved, the ASD may be able to secretly access the digital information of Australians including emails, health data, bank records, and text messages.

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Government Regulation, Legislation and Enforcement Updates

by Jim Bulling and Julia Baldi

China Introduces new Cybersecurity Laws
China introduced new cybersecurity laws, which require both local and foreign banks and financial institutions with Chinese clients (including Australian financial institutions) to use IT equipment deemed “secure and controllable” by Beijing. The breadth of the laws has upset foreign financial institutions given the potential cost of compliance if foreign entities must implement IT equipment systems in accordance with Chinese directives.

See the Financial Times report here.

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