CyberWatch: Australia

Insight on how cyber risk is being mitigated and managed in Australia and across the globe.

 

1
Update on the Criminalisation of Non-Consensual Distribution of Intimate Images in WA: Another Conviction in Australia
2
Brexit: Deal or No-Deal? Data is the Question
3
Aviation Sector Resolves to Protect Industry from Cyber Threats
4
PROPOSAL TO INCREASE PENALTIES FOR PRIVACY BREACHES
5
Hospital systems in quarantine after ransomware attack in Victoria
6
Riding in cars with hackers
7
Hyp3r-misappropriation of data gets Instagram’s attention, but is enough being done?
8
Human error accounts for 34% of Notifiable Data Breaches – 3 key take outs from the latest OAIC report
9
Is your iPhone spying on you (again)?
10
Technology mightier than the Sword: US Military’s Secret Cyber Strike stifles Iranian Forces

Update on the Criminalisation of Non-Consensual Distribution of Intimate Images in WA: Another Conviction in Australia

By Olivia O’Brien, Philip Murray and Kathleen Weston

Just a few months ago, we published an article on the criminalisation of the non-consensual distribution of intimate images in Western Australia. Only this week, there has been a second successful conviction under the Criminal Law Amendment (Intimate Images) Act 2018 (WA) (WA Act) in the Rockingham Magistrate’s Court.

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Brexit: Deal or No-Deal? Data is the Question

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

With the Brexit deadline looming as 31 October 2019, and no finalised deal in place, the prospects of an inconclusive Brexit are growing. Therefore, there remains significant uncertainty as to the actions and preparations of entities who are subject to the unpredictable tides of this political sea. So how should such companies prepare in these circumstances of a foreseeable no-deal? Our colleagues have tackled this challenging question in Volume 1 of The Privacist available at the K&L Gates Hub.

Aviation Sector Resolves to Protect Industry from Cyber Threats

By Cameron Abbott and Karla Hodgson

Cybersecurity is now well and truly a priority for the aviation sector, with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) adopting an action-oriented cybersecurity resolution at its 40th Triennial Assembly earlier this month.

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PROPOSAL TO INCREASE PENALTIES FOR PRIVACY BREACHES

By Cameron Abbott and Rebecca Gill

In light of concerns over how personal data is being used by social media platforms and tech companies, the Commonwealth Government has proposed amendments to the Privacy Act in order to more harshly penalise companies for privacy breaches. The new regime, which aims to update Australia’s privacy laws in line with increased social media use, will see tougher penalties for all entities that are subject to the Privacy Act, not just the headline companies like Google and Facebook.

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Riding in cars with hackers

By Cameron Abbott, Michelle Aggromito and Alyssia Totham

Ransom-based hacking techniques have primarily been limited to the intangible. We live in a world where unauthorised access to email accounts, bank accounts, and computer systems that may otherwise be private is no longer uncommon.

In some situations, hackers demand a lump sum in return for reinstating control of the accounts and systems to its owners and managers, and otherwise refusing to pay this ransom can likely leave our information and data at the mercy of hackers.

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Hyp3r-misappropriation of data gets Instagram’s attention, but is enough being done?

By Cameron Abbott, Michelle Aggromito and Alyssia Totham

Until recently, a security vulnerability in the social media platform Instagram, allowed Hyp3r to illicitly harvest millions of Instagram users’ data and track their locations.

In a similar manner to the Cambridge Analytica scandal that plagued Facebook following the 2016 US presidential election, this latest example of Hyp3r’s mass data collection was discovered through a journalistic investigation and was not uncovered by the social media platform.

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Human error accounts for 34% of Notifiable Data Breaches – 3 key take outs from the latest OAIC report

By Cameron Abbott and Karla Hodgson

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner has released its Q2 statistics on notifications received under the Notifiable Data Breach (NDB) scheme. The 245 breach notifications in Q2 are on par with each other quarter since the scheme was introduced in July 2018 and while the majority of NDBs (62%) are attributed to malicious or criminal attacks, we noted with interest that a staggering 34% are due to human error – that is, mostly avoidable errors made by staff. A consistent theme of our blogs is reinforcing the message that employees are the front line of defence for organisations.

There are 3 key statistics we took away from these human error NDBs.

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Is your iPhone spying on you (again)?

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

In the latest installment of this seemingly ongoing tale, Google uncovered (for the second time in a month) security flaws in Apple’s iOS, which put thousands of users at risk of inadvertently installing spyware on their iPhones. For two years.

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Technology mightier than the Sword: US Military’s Secret Cyber Strike stifles Iranian Forces

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

Everyone knows the saying “the Pen is mightier than the sword”. The famous saying has been used for centuries to describe the ultimate power of words and communication over forms of violence. However, the rapid implementation and use of technology as a “combat” method doubts whether this saying is correct in a modern technological era, and begs the question as to whether technology is in fact mightier than the sword!

This dilemma is highlighted through the recent cyberstrike conducted by the United States. According to a Report by the Washington Post, in June of this year the Cyber Command of the US Military utilised a technology cyberstrike to target a significant Iranian database in the Persian Gulf. The relevant database was alleged to have been used by the IRGC, Iran’s elite paramilitary force, to damage oil takers and shipping traffic in the Persian Gulf. According to the Pentagon, the operation was in the works for weeks after Iran’s alleged attacks on two US tankers in the Gulf of Oman earlier in June, and following an attack by Iranian forces on an unmanned U.S. Surveillance drone hours earlier, the cyber-strike was immediately given the go-ahead.

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