Category: Privacy, Data Protection & Information Management

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A JEDI Uses the Force for Knowledge and Defense: The Pentagon awards US$10billion JEDI cloud deal to Microsoft
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California’s answer to the GDPR – the California Consumer Privacy Act kicks in on 1 Jan 2020
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Proposed Regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act: A Step in the Right Direction but Far from the Destination
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Lead the Way: Liechtenstein and Bavarian Data Protection Authorities Publish Guidance on Data Access and Security
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Pushing for Change: Congress Pushes for Privacy Legislation ahead of CCPA
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Could your ERP system make you a victim of cybercrime?
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Insufficiency meets Punishment: Polish DPA issues largest fine for Insufficient Security and Organisational Measures
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The FBI understands if you pay ransom to cyber hackers, but isn’t too pleased about it
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Hand Out of the Cookie Jar: CJEU Issues Long-Awaited Decision on Cookies
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Update on the Criminalisation of Non-Consensual Distribution of Intimate Images in WA: Another Conviction in Australia

A JEDI Uses the Force for Knowledge and Defense: The Pentagon awards US$10billion JEDI cloud deal to Microsoft

By Cameron Abbott and Tan Xin Ya

In October, the US Department of Defence (DoD) awarded the Joint Enterprise Defence Infrastructure (JEDI) contract to Microsoft to overhaul its IT infrastructure – a huge show of confidence in infrastructure as a service (IaaS).

The DoD’s award of the 10-year, $10 billion JEDI contract to Microsoft is an endorsement of the secure nature of Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing service. Under this deal, Microsoft’s task is to create a globally responsive network and monitor ongoing issues such as bugs and breaches. Part of the deal involves moving sensitive data, including classified mission operations, to Microsoft Azure. The system must be fortified with robust cyber security and encryption as Microsoft bears the important responsibility for the defence of the US.

The DoD’s decision to move to the cloud is a clear signal that IaaS has come of age, considering when such a security sensitive operation is able to use the service.

California’s answer to the GDPR – the California Consumer Privacy Act kicks in on 1 Jan 2020

By Cameron Abbott ,Tan Xin Ya and John ReVeal

In just a short few weeks, a monumental change of privacy regulations will kick in for US businesses. On 1 January 2020, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) will come into effect, with a compliance deadline at the end of January 2020, and signifies a shift in tone in the privacy sphere for the US – with a move closer to global privacy norms, and away from the perspective that personal data is a company asset.

A series of data disasters such as Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal and the massive Equifax breach left many Americans feeling powerless. Regulators stepped in after the fact to punish the companies, but at the time, there was little that U.S. consumers could do to prevent data breaches. Under the CCPA, Americans (well, Californians, mostly) move a step closer to general privacy protection. However, the Act only targets larger companies or those with prolific data use so there is still a long way to go to being general protection.

In October, the California Governor signed five bills to amend CCPA to provide some regulatory relief for businesses when the CCPA comes into effect. For a detailed analysis on the amendments, we refer you to Volume 2 of our colleagues’ Volume 2 of The Privacists available at the K&L Gates Hub.

Proposed Regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act: A Step in the Right Direction but Far from the Destination

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

We recently blogged about the intention of Californian lawmakers to enact stringent privacy regulations through the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). In particular, we noted the useful guidance provided by our colleagues over at The Privacist on the impact of potential contingencies for organisations.

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Lead the Way: Liechtenstein and Bavarian Data Protection Authorities Publish Guidance on Data Access and Security

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

Drawing on the requirements imposed in respect of privacy and data protection by the General Data Protection Regulation, Liechtenstein and Bavaria have published some useful guidance on several key elements of the relevant regulation.

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Pushing for Change: Congress Pushes for Privacy Legislation ahead of CCPA

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

With the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) looming, Californian lawmakers have affirmed their intention to enact stringent privacy protections, with the legislature adjourning without making any major changes to the state’s landmark privacy laws.

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Could your ERP system make you a victim of cybercrime?

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

We frequently blog here about incidents where companies, government agencies or public have suffered data or security breaches at the hands of hackers. They’re often incidents that come to light because they affect the public in some way – by shutting down hospitals, exposing sensitive personal information, or threatening government security. But what about hacks that, while not having wide-reaching public implications, go to the core of a business’ operations?

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Insufficiency meets Punishment: Polish DPA issues largest fine for Insufficient Security and Organisational Measures

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

Further to the Facebook and Tesco scandals, and the apparent statistic increase of enforcement fines issued, the Polish Data Protection Authority has issued a landmark fine of €645,000 against online retail company morele.net for insufficient security and organisational measures violating data confidentiality and integrity principles prescribed in the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation.

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The FBI understands if you pay ransom to cyber hackers, but isn’t too pleased about it

By Cameron Abbott and Karla Hodgson

While the FBI won’t be impressed if you pay ransomware demands in order to get your systems or data back after a cyber attack, its updated ransomware guidance contemplates that this might just be the outcome of an attack anyway.

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Hand Out of the Cookie Jar: CJEU Issues Long-Awaited Decision on Cookies

By Cameron Abbott and Max Evans

Earlier this month, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) issued a long-awaited decision with respect to the requirements necessary for entities to satisfy in order to attain the valid consent of a user to the use of cookies to track and analyse his or her personal information.

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Update on the Criminalisation of Non-Consensual Distribution of Intimate Images in WA: Another Conviction in Australia

By Olivia O’Brien, Philip Murray and Kathleen Weston

Just a few months ago, we published an article on the criminalisation of the non-consensual distribution of intimate images in Western Australia. Only this week, there has been a second successful conviction under the Criminal Law Amendment (Intimate Images) Act 2018 (WA) (WA Act) in the Rockingham Magistrate’s Court.

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