Category: Managing Threats & Attacks

1
Privacy Commissioner releases a Guide to deal with data breaches
2
Bangladesh Bank considers legal action against the NY Fed in Hollywood-esque hack
3
Been Hacked? To Report Or Not To Report… To The SEC, It Isn’t Even A Question.
4
Nissan shakes like a LEAF and disables app after car hacking potential exposed
5
It’s official and, it’s personal – Gemalto’s 2015 results reveal scary cybercrime stats
6
Apple sends passionate message to customers following court order to hack iPhone
7
Scary statistics reveal 39,000 reported cybercrime incidents in 2015
8
Microsoft cuts support for Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10
9
Complex ModPOS Malware Infects Point-of-Sale Terminals in Lead up to Christmas Spend Frenzy
10
Hotel Industry Payment Systems Under Attack

Privacy Commissioner releases a Guide to deal with data breaches

By Cameron Abbott, Rob Pulham and Simon Ly

On 11 April 2016, the Privacy Commissioner released a guide to deal with issues associated with data breaches. This is aimed at entities regulated by the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) in order to assist them with complying with the Australian Privacy Principles.

When (and it is likely to be a matter of when and not if) your entity is subject to a data breach, whether it be through your system being hacked or if devices are lost or stolen, it is important that you are equipped to deal with it. It is important to get in front of such problems and have pre-prepared action plans given that it is likely that the first 24 hours will be the most crucial in determining your level of success in dealing with a data breach. Data breaches can be expensive, both in a monetary and reputational sense.

In the guide, the Privacy Commissioner highlighted that a written data breach response plan is an important tool to help deal with such issues. Such a plan should include:

  • actions to be taken if a breach is suspected, discovered or reported by a staff member, including escalation measures;
  • the members of the data breach response team; and
  • the actions the team are expected to take.

Such a plan needs to be regularly reviewed and updated, with all relevant staff kept up to date so that they know what actions they are expected to take.

The Privacy Commissioner suggests the following four steps to be taken when a data breach is discovered:

  1. contain the breach and do a preliminary assessment;
  2. evaluate the risks associated with the breach;
  3. develop a plan for notifying affected individuals and consider what information should be in any notification; and
  4. determine steps to be taken to prevent future breaches.

For more information, please feel free to contact us. You can find out more information on practical steps you can take here.

Bangladesh Bank considers legal action against the NY Fed in Hollywood-esque hack

By Cameron Abbott and Simon Ly

In a story that would make an excellent plot to a sequel to Ocean’s 13, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York has been the target of a successful major cyber hack. Part of the targeted attack was an attempt to steal nearly $1 billion from Bangladesh Bank’s account.

If anyone would be well protected it would be the NY Fed, right? Well, while they were able to block some 30 transactions, 5 were successful, resulting in $81 million being stolen from Bangladesh Bank’s account.

The NY Fed has released a statement outlining that its systems were not breached, but instead pointing to SWIFT, a member-owned cooperative relied upon by banks to authenticate international monetary transactions. In response, a SWIFT representative stated that it “reiterates that the SWIFT network itself was not breached”. For its part, the NY Fed agreed that it “viewed this as a major lapse on the part of FRB NY”.

It will be fascinating to see how this he-said she-said blame game plays out. The current state of events is that the Bangladesh Bank is engaging legal counsel to establish grounds for recompense.

It goes without saying that these mind boggling figures and the nature of the attack emphasise that no one is immune from attacks. Next time someone tells you that it can’t happen to your organisation – remember this example.

For more information, please see Bloomberg’s report here.

Been Hacked? To Report Or Not To Report… To The SEC, It Isn’t Even A Question.

By Tyler Kirk

In the US, the Securities and Exchange Commission has encouraged its regulated entities to self-report. If entities do not self-report, there is the very real possibility that a whistleblower may disclose a cybersecurity incident to the Commission. Significantly, the SEC has indicated that it would take a more adversarial position against an entity that does not self-report.
When self-reporting cybersecurity incidents to the SEC, it is important to approach the Commission with a well thought out plan for responding to the incident. Moreover, a remediation strategy should be a part of every entity’s cybersecurity policies and procedures.

After a cybersecurity incident, SEC regulated entities, such as investment companies and their boards, should move quickly to establish the scope of the incident, decide whether to self-report to the SEC, and begin the remediation process. According to the Commission, under some circumstances, the SEC has tools available to assist with remediation.

Importantly, self-reporting cybersecurity incidents to the SEC could benefit an investment company and its board by leading to a reduced penalty in the event an enforcement action is brought on the basis of the incident.

Nissan shakes like a LEAF and disables app after car hacking potential exposed

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

Lock you doors…oh wait, that won’t protect you. Australian security researchers, Troy Hunt and Scott Helme have exposed a security flaw in Nissan’s Connect app which allows certain features of the manufacturer’s best-selling electric car, the ‘LEAF’, to literally be controlled by someone else on the other side of the world.

Hunt and Helme recently discovered that the app did not require any owner identification information in order to link with and control LEAF cars. All that was required was the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), which is conveniently displayed on the chassis of the vehicle.

OK, so hackers couldn’t actually steer the car, but they could command the climate control and telematics to access driving data about trip durations, raising privacy concerns. Further, given that the LEAF is an electric powered vehicle, being able to access the climate controls could potentially allow a hacker to drain the battery and leave a driver stranded.

Car companies are racing to embrace the internet of things, and privacy and security seems to be taking a back seat. While there is no doubt that connected car technology boasts exciting functionality for drivers, it is not without road bumps, and we are once again reminded of the dangerous potential presented by interconnected devices. With a bit of luck, Nissan’s scare will see the automotive industry get in the driver’s seat towards developing a better appreciation of the risks associated with these devices and how they can be mitigated.

Nissan has now reportedly disabled the NissanConnect app and plans to release a new version once these security concerns are rectified. According to Hunt’s blog post, it took Nissan more than a month to take the app offline after he reported the security vulnerabilities.

Read Troy Hunt’s blog post on the discovery here.

It’s official and, it’s personal – Gemalto’s 2015 results reveal scary cybercrime stats

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

Never mind your credit card details, let’s worry about cybercriminals stealing your identity.

The latest Breach Level Index released by Gemalto has revealed that identity theft was the primary target of hackers in 2015, with stolen personal information accounting for 53% of all data breaches.

It’s a worry, you see, because while your credit card has inbuilt security defences and merchant protection mechanisms, your valuable personal information is probably stored in multiple locations, across a number of interfaces, in a variety of forms, exposing it to substantial risk of theft.

Not only is the massive volume of personal information that is available to be stolen a cause for alarm, but what cybercriminals can potentially do with that information is the major concern.

So who is to blame? Well, malicious outsiders were the leading source of data breaches in 2015, accounting for 58%, accidental loss of data was next and then came malicious insiders, who accounted for 14% of all data breaches.

Clearly, companies need to recognise that today’s cyber environment demands robust security strategies that not only protect networks from external attacks and accidental data loss, but also keep an eye on insiders too.

To secure against a data breach, Gemalto recommends that organisations commit to the encryption of all sensitive information, secure storage and management of data and encryption keys, and controlled access and authentication of users.

Access the Gemalto 2015 Breach Level Index Report here.

Apple sends passionate message to customers following court order to hack iPhone

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

A US District Court has ordered Apple to assist US law enforcement agents to bypass the security features, disable the auto-erase function and ultimately access the data contained within an iPhone 5C that was used by one of the San Bernardino shooters, Syed Rizwan Farook.

Apple’s CEO Tim Cook responded to the order with an open letter to customers discussing the privacy and security implications of the order and calling for public discussion on the issue.

Read Apple’s Customer Letter here.

Access the Court Order here.

Scary statistics reveal 39,000 reported cybercrime incidents in 2015

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

Following its launch in November 2014, the Australian Cyber Online Reporting Network (ACORN) has revealed it fielded 39,000 reports of cybercrime from individuals and organisations in 2015. Fraud was the most commonly reported cybercrime, with 19,232 reports being made to ACORN last year.

Prominent data analytics group and credit bureau, Veda revealed similarly worrying statistics in the Veda 2015 Cybercrime and Fraud Report, noting that in 2015, 1 in 4 Australians reported being a victim of identity theft at some stage, up 7% from 2014. The report also suggests that Australians are becoming increasingly concerned about the risk of cybercrime and identity theft.

Veda has projected that 2016 will see even greater numbers of cybercrime attacks on individuals, firms and government agencies as the ‘Internet of Things’ further develops, reliance on social media grows and a profound amount of personal information and data continues to be collected.

Read the ACORN quarterly statistics reports here.

Microsoft cuts support for Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

Today, Microsoft will initiate the ‘end-of-life’ phase for the company’s older Web browsers, Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10. Customers using the outdated browsers will be sent an ‘end-of-life upgrade notification’ as technical support and security updates have now ceased.

Microsoft has encouraged the several hundred million users who currently operate the outdated browsers to upgrade to Internet Explorer 11 or Microsoft Edge, which they suggest offers better-quality security and improved performance.

While users currently running Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10 will still be able to use their browsers, Microsoft has warned there is a significant security risk of continuing to run the outdated versions. Without the periodic security updates and routine technical support, the outdated browsers will be vulnerable to cyber-attacks, malware and other security threats.

Australian Corporations have an obligation to keep materials secure under the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) and should therefore consider the risk that using the unsupported browsers may not be sufficient to meet this requirement.

Access the Microsoft release here.

Complex ModPOS Malware Infects Point-of-Sale Terminals in Lead up to Christmas Spend Frenzy

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

While the festive season approaches and retailers prepare for their busiest time of the year, a sophisticated form of point-of-sale malware, known as ‘ModPOS’, has reared its ugly head and is targeting payment terminals in the U.S.

It is estimated that the first ModPOS data hacks occurred in 2013 and that millions of credit and debit cards used at a broad variety of U.S. retailers have since been compromised. The unique complexity of the code, which experts say has never been seen before in malware, made it tricky to decipher.

Cyber security experts have warned that ModPOS has the ability to not only “scrape” credit and debit card numbers from the memory of point-of-sale terminals, but that the multifaceted code also records keystrokes of computer operators and transmits stolen data. If that isn’t enough, the malware is particularly difficult to detect and is reportedly capable of infiltrating despite security software and data controls.

More details about ModPOS malware can be found here.

Hotel Industry Payment Systems Under Attack

By Cameron Abbott and Meg Aitken

Stayed at one of Hilton Worldwide Holdings’ (Hilton) hotels between 18 November – 5 December 2014 or 21 April – 27 July 2015? Check your bank statement.

Within the same week, both the Hilton and Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Inc. (Starwood) have discovered the point-of-sale terminals at a number of hotels across the globe have been infected with malware.

The malicious malware has enabled hackers to pinch the credit and debit card information of Starwood and Hilton customers, however there is apparently no evidence that personal contact information provided as part of the hotels’ guest-reservation system or loyalty rewards program was stolen.

While the attack on Starwood was confined to 54 of its hotels in North America, the Hilton attack affected the chain’s hotels globally, including Australian establishments. The number of cards compromised has not been revealed by either hotel.

Starwood and Hilton hotels are not the only luxury hotel chains to be affected by data hacks in 2015. The Mandarin Oriental and Trump International have also reported data security breaches involving intrusive malware this year. In the case of Starwood the hack occurred over eight months without detection showing how sophisticated some of these attacks are.

Starwood’s media release can be found here. Hilton’s media release can be accessed here.

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