Archive: June 2019

1
The OAIC engages in more in-depth investigations and stronger exercise of its power
2
US Internet of Things bill advanced to vote on House floor
3
Major privacy and security breaches confirmed this week: Westpac, the ANU and Princess Polly targeted
4
PwC’s Enforcement Tracker finds a large increase in fines for privacy breaches in the UK

The OAIC engages in more in-depth investigations and stronger exercise of its power

By Cameron Abbott, Rob Pulham and Jacqueline Patishman

Following two key data incidents concerning how the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) handled data, the OAIC has successfully taken court action binding the banking heavyweight to “substantially improve its privacy practices”.

As a quick summary of the incidents, the first incident involved the loss of magnetic storage tapes (which are used to print account statements). These contained historical customer data including customer statements of up to 20 million bank customers. In 2016, the CBA was unable to confirm that the two magnetic tapes were securely disposed of after the scheduled destruction by a supplier.

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US Internet of Things bill advanced to vote on House floor

By Cameron Abbott and Rebecca Gill

Just a few months ago, we blogged on the ‘Internet of Things’ (or IoT) legislation making an appearance in the US Senate. But now the legislation may be becoming a reality. On Wednesday, the House Committee on Oversight and Reform advanced the Internet of Things Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2019 to a vote on the House floor.

The bipartisan legislation aims to reduce the risk to critical government information technology infrastructure from cyberattacks, and directs the National Institute of Standards and Technology to develop recommendations for use and management of internet-connected devices by March 31 2020.

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Major privacy and security breaches confirmed this week: Westpac, the ANU and Princess Polly targeted

By Cameron Abbott, Allison Wallace and Rebecca Gill

It’s been a chilly start to winter for three Australian organisations, who’ve this week reported major privacy and security breaches.

Up to 100,000 Australians’ personal information has been exposed in a hack affecting Westpac Bank. Westpac confirmed on Monday that details of Australian bank customers (not just those of Westpac) were exposed in a cyberattack on real time payments platform PayID. The banking giant says it noted a high volume of PayID lookups in 2019 on a semi-daily basis, which was a result of attackers trying to guess phone numbers, which, if guessed correctly, would give them the name of the account holder to which the number is linked. Despite the hack, Westpac says that no customer bank account details were compromised as a result of this cyberattack. Nevertheless, experts warn that the details accessed could still be used to commit fraud.

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PwC’s Enforcement Tracker finds a large increase in fines for privacy breaches in the UK

By Cameron Abbott and Rebecca Gill

PwC’s UK Privacy & Security Enforcement Tracker has found that fines in the UK over data protection law violations totalled £6.5 million in 2018, a £2 million increase from 2017.

The Tracker analysed data protection enforcement actions by the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), including monetary fines, prosecutions and undertakings. The Tracker shows that the total sum of fines increased from 2017, but the number of ICO enforcements fell to 67 in 2018 from 91 in 2017.

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