Archive: 2017

1
India’s top court asks WhatsApp, Facebook to please explain over privacy policy
2
Alarming number of Enterprise Cloud Services aren’t enterprise ready
3
Cookies, Directories, Advertising and Personal Data: New EU Rules on Privacy in Electronic Communications
4
SAP criticises impending EU data protection laws
5
Cyber-attacks: a problem in 2016, still a problem in 2017
6
UK companies taking on cybersecurity-related insurance in soaring numbers

India’s top court asks WhatsApp, Facebook to please explain over privacy policy

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

A petition to challenge messenger service WhatsApp’s privacy policy in India is gaining momentum, with the Supreme Court this week issuing notices to WhatsApp, its owner Facebook, and the telecom regulator TRAI to respond to the court within two weeks.

The petitioners are incensed over WhatsApp’s changes to its privacy policy in September last year, which saw it begin sharing users information with Facebook, including their phone numbers. Those who didn’t agree with the new policy were given the option to “opt out” by deleting the app. This announcement came two years after WhatsApp was acquired by Facebook. Read More

Alarming number of Enterprise Cloud Services aren’t enterprise ready

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

A new report has revealed 95% of cloud services used by enterprises aren’t enterprise ready.

The January 2017 Netskope Cloud Report reveals a staggering 82% don’t encrypt data at rest, 66 per cent don’t specify in their terms that the customer owns their own data, and 42% don’t allow administrators to enforce password controls.

Of malware found in cloud services, backdoors were the most common (43.2%), with others including adware (9.8%), Javascript malware (8.1%) and ransomware (7.4%).

The report also shows an increase in the use of cloud services – with an average of 1031 cloud services in use per enterprise, up from 977 in the previous quarter. The retail, restaurant and hospitality industry was the biggest user of cloud services (1193), followed by financial services, banking and insurance (1132).

Cookies, Directories, Advertising and Personal Data: New EU Rules on Privacy in Electronic Communications

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

With the EU heading full throttle towards the implementation of new data protection regulations in May 2018, there has been a lot of buzz around the impact the regulations will have, not only on day-to-day life, but other existing regulations.

One of these regulations is the Directive 2002/58/EC aka the ePrivacy Directive, which has been urgently reviewed ahead of the data protection regulations being implemented.

Brussels partner Ignasi Guardans has detailed the review and its implications here.

SAP criticises impending EU data protection laws

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

SAP has expressed concerns over the implications of the landmark EU data privacy regulations, saying the penalties that will be imposed are too high, and could impede the development of Europe’s start-up culture.

The data privacy regulation will be implemented in May 2018, and includes fines for EU companies up to 4 per cent of their global revenues if they commit a significant breach of data privacy.

In an interview with the Financial Times, SAP’s head of products and innovation, Bernd Leukert said he believes the penalties are too high, and put companies at risk of losing their entire revenue if they commit multiple breaches.

Mr Leukert said he also fears that the EU regulations were not properly aligned with laws in other jurisdictions, such as the US.

Cyber-attacks: a problem in 2016, still a problem in 2017

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

A survey of nearly 600 organisations across a variety of industries globally has revealed 98% of these organisations experienced some form of cyber-attack in 2016. (We are left wondering if the other 2% just didn’t notice?)

The survey, conducted by cyber-security company Radware, also found that many organisations are still not prepared to face the threat landscape including that 40% of organisations do not have an incident response plan in place.

Respondents indicated that ransom was the top motivation behind cyber-attacks (41%), followed by insider threats (27%), political hacktivism (26%) and competition (26%).

Radware’s Vice President of Security Solutions, Carl Herberger, says that money is the top motivator in today’s threat landscape. He says “attackers employ an ever-increasing number of tactics to steal valuable information, from ransom attacks that can lock up a company’s data, to DDoS attacks that act as a smoke screen for information theft, to direct brute force or injection attacks that grant direct access to internal data”.

Radware predicts that in 2017, we will see an increase in the use of IoT botnets, cyber ransom, telephony DoS, permanent denial of service for data centre and IoT operations, and public transport being held hostage.

Not the most positive outlook for 2017, but it would be a brave person to suggest they are wrong with those predictions.

UK companies taking on cybersecurity-related insurance in soaring numbers

By Cameron Abbott and Allison Wallace

There was a 50% growth in the adoption of cybersecurity-related insurance in the UK between 2015 and 2016.

CFC Underwriting discovered the trend after polling industry representatives at the 2016 Cyber Symposium late last year.

The underwriter, which provides cyber insurance to more than 20000 clients globally, found the factors driving clients to purchase these kinds of policies included the “fear factor” of a cyber attack (23%) and the impending introduction of the European General Data Protection Regulation in 2018 (26%).

More than half of the respondents to the poll (53%) indicated they believed electronic computer crime will lead to an increase in insurance claims. Earlier figures released by CFC Underwriting revealed it handled over 400 claims on cyber policies in 2016, a 78% increase on 2015.

Copyright © 2019, K&L Gates LLP. All Rights Reserved.